End of Conflict

The concept “End of Conflict” between Israel and the Palestinians refers to the official termination of the 'State of Conflict' between the two parties, as a result of a Permanent Status Agreement that may possibly include a Security Council Resolution.

Definition

The concept “End of Conflict” between Israel and the Palestinians refers to the official termination of the 'State of Conflict' between the two parties, as a result of a Permanent Status Agreement that may possibly include a Security Council Resolution.

Background

Under 'Existing Agreements' between Israel and the PLO, the current state of Israeli-Palestinian relations is one of 'conflict'. A 'State of Conflict' is a condition of confrontation formally agreed by the parties to exist between them. 1

'End of Conflict' in Israeli-Palestinian relations would constitute a change in the type of relationship between Israel and the Palestinians: From 'conflict' - the state currently specified under existing agreements - to a different type of relationship under international law, whether 'peace', 'transition to peace', or another status.

The goal of negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians during the '1999-2001 Permanent Status Negotiations' was to reach an End of Conflict.2

End of Conflict can be reached only by agreement between the parties. Its achievement will result in reaching a 'Finality of Claims'3 between Israel and the Palestinians as well as resolving other outstanding issues between Israel and the Palestinians, such as Israel achieving an 'End of Occupation' over disputed territories and an 'End of Responsibility' for the socioeconomic well being of the Palestinian population.4



1 See, e.g., 'Declaration of Principles' (13/9/93) (Israel and the Palestinian Delegation “agree that it is time to put an end to decades of confrontation and conflict . . .”); Letter from Yasser Arafat to Pres. Clinton (13/1/98) (the PLO has committed itself “to a peaceful resolution of the conflict between the two sides”); Government of Israel Resolution Regarding the "Disengagement Plan", Addendum A, 1 (6/6/04) (“The State of Israel is committed to the peace process and aspires to reach an agreed resolution of the conflict based upon the vision of US President George Bush”).

2 See, e.g., the abovementioned citation from the Declaration of Principles, and: Sher Gilead, Just Beyond Reach, Tel-Aviv: Miskal, 2001.

3 The concept 'Finality of Claims' refers to an Israeli stipulation for signing a Permanent Status Agreement (PSA) with the Palestinians that would: · Resolve all Outstanding Issues;· Encompass any claim either side might raise throughout the negotiation process;· Constitute the sole basis for resolving any future disputes between Israel and the Palestinians. The implementation of the PSA would be the only source of claims between the two sides.

4 The disagreement between Israel and the Palestinians over when exactly an End of Conflict is achieved, further contributed to the lack of trust between the two sides. Moreover, different peace plans in recent years have taken conflicting stances on what constitutes the End of Conflict and Finality of Claims.

  • The Clinton Parameters (12/00) declared that agreement over Permanent Status marks the End of the Conflict while its implementation signals the Finality of Claims;

  • The One Voice Ayalon-Nusseibeh Document declares that the End of Conflict and Finality of Claims will be achieved simultaneously with the implementation of the principles in the agreement;

  • The Arab Peace Initiative (3/02) and the Geneva Accords (10/03) do not specifically mention an End of Conflict cause; The Arab Peace Initiative states that after Israel has fulfilled its obligations, the Arab states will consider the Israeli-Arab conflict ended; The Geneva Accords refer to the agreement ending an 'era of conflict' and its implementation settling all the parties' claims.