Conflict Management

The concept refers to striving towards reducing the intensity of a conflict by controlling its generators, in light of a party's lack of will or ability either to overcome its opponent or to resolve the conflict.

Definition

The concept "conflict management" refers to striving towards reducing the intensity of a conflict by controlling its generators, in light of a party's lack of will or ability either to overcome its opponent or to resolve the conflict.

Background

The logics behind "conflict management" relies on either (1) deferring the resolution of the conflict, under the assumption that it is currently impossible to resolve or win the conflict; or (2) the assumption that the continuation of the conflict is preferable to its resolution.1

While conflict resolution necessitates the consent of both parties, conflict management can be achieved also through unilateral or third-party-coordinated actions.

Reducing the intensity of the conflict includes reducing the negative economic, political and security negative implications of the conflict.

The relation between conflict management and conflict resolution changes from one conflict to the other. However, a substantial decrease in the intensity of a conflict, may serve as a disincentive for the parties to strive towards a permanent solution.

Documents

  • Arad, Uzi, "Interim Agreements and Conflict Management", in Mark A. Heller and Rosemary Hollis (eds.), Israel and the Palestinians: Israeli Policy Options", Tel Aviv, Yaffe Center for Strategic Studies (2005), pp. 33- 40 (in Hebrew).
  • Bar-Siman-Tov, Yaacov, "Dialectics between Conflict Management and its Resolution", in Tamar Hermann and Ephraim Yaar (eds.), Is the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Solvable? Tel Aviv, The Tami Steinmetz Center for Peace Research, (2001), pp. 122- 129 (in Hebrew).
  • Zartman, William, and J. Lewis Rasmussen, (ed.), Peacemaking in International Conflict: Methods & Techniques, Washington, United States Institute of Peace, 2001.


1 Zartman, "Toward the Resolution of International Conflicts", in Zartman and Rasmussen (ed.), Peacemaking in International Conflict: Methods and Techniques, (Washington: United States Institute of Peace, 2001), p. 16.